Solo Shows

Solo Shows

Morgan Fisher’s non-conformity: Measured and potent

Contributed by Marjorie Welish / There’s formalism and then there is formalism. In his solo show at Bortolami Gallery, Morgan Fisher excels at both. He is faithful to the modernist credo of line, plane, and color synthesized through composition. But he is also intent on making his work serve logical propositions generated from the practice of painting itself. This conceptual formalism is his domain, and it rewards close attention. Fitful likes and dislikes begone!

Solo Shows

Cora Cohen’s thoroughbred abstraction

Contributed by Michael Brennan / The virtues of some art emerge only when it steps out of its own time. Hilma af Klint’s 2018 retrospective at the Guggenheim is an example. Another is Lou Reed’s album Berlin, released and widely panned in 1973, only to be performed and filmed by Julian Schnabel 35 years later, celebrated by an unforeseen audience, and subsequently considered a canonical masterpiece. Cora Cohen did exhibit her work in the 1980s and has been showing regularly, at a high level, since the 1970s. She’s a well-known, well-regarded painter. But the eight large abstract paintings from the 1980s, now on display at Morgan Presents, haven’t been shown together until now. They are a revelation that couldn’t have fully registered in its own time. 

Solo Shows

Artist’s Statement: Vittorio Colaizzi

The paintings come from drawing—not finished plans but compositional ideas that make way for the painting process. Each shape is an instance of color and a dissolution of strokes that partially reveals its underlayers and the adjustments that led to its present condition. The initial linear-spatial impetus remains, as does the bare ground on which everything gathers…

Solo Shows

Hank Ehrenfried’s painterly erudition 

Contributed by Michael Brennan / “Fold Upon Fold,” the title of Hank Ehrenfried’s first solo exhibition in New York, at Auxier Kline on the Lower East Side, is an expression borrowed from a sonnet by French Symbolist Stéphane Mallarmé. It succinctly describes the creative premise behind every painting presented. Working in the trompe l’oeil style, Ehrenfried paints realistic images of his own collages, made mostly during the pandemic. Making the collages the subject of the paintings lends the show a lightly but distinctly meta character, reflecting both the claustrophobic intensity and the intellectual expansiveness of his endeavor.

Solo Shows

Charles Yuen’s spores and magic

shifting formal narrative devices, and push paint in a variety of combinations in vast and surprising ways. Such a painter is Charles Yuen, whom I somehow discovered online during the pandemic. The mycelia network of interweb algorithms finally delivered a plump mushroom. “Between Here and Now” is Yuen’s second solo show with Pamela Salisbury Gallery in Hudson, NY. 

Solo Shows

Kris Rac’s artful provocations

Contributed by Abshalom Jac Lahav / Kris Rac wears many hats. They are an artist, a medievalist pursuing a Ph.D. in art history, and a partner at Field Projects Gallery. Their work is political, poetic, and visceral, and these qualities are displayed in Rac’s recent show at Home Gallery on the Lower East Side. 

Solo Shows

Frank Owen, trailblazing innovator

Contributed by Jason Andrew / I first came to know the work of Frank Owen over two decades ago through the sculptor Joel Perlman. I stepped off the elevator at Perlman’s studio on West Broadway and immediately encountered an Owen painting. It seemed fitting to discover such a physical painter as Owen through a sculptor. Only recently I learned that the title of that painting was Augmented Position, also fitting insofar as Owen has challenged and changed the way one can experience painting. The proof is in his current show “Retrospection,” on view at Nancy Hoffman Gallery.