Conversation

Conversation Writing

Me-me-me careerism vs. the new generosity

As the Guest Blogger at ART:21 today, I take a look at a few artists who embody the pragmatism and ingenuity of the new Obama administration. “Artists who garner the most attention in any given time period are those whose work, explicitly or implicitly, reflects the deeper political sensibilities of […]

Conversation Writing

Peter Schjeldahl’s insouciance

In The New York Review of Books, Sanford Schwartz considers Peter Schjeldahl’s unique contribution to art criticism. “Schjeldahl addresses us in a conversational prose that moves from point to point with the speed and ease of some high-tech instrument. He is a writer whose colloquial approach masks both a rather […]

Conversation Writing

Micchelli: How art can effect political change

At Art:21 Blog, the Flash Points guest blogger series is focusing on art and politics this month. Today, Brooklyn Rail writer/editor Tom Micchelli, after seeing a performance of The Investigation, a 1966 documentary drama by Peter Weiss (1916-1982), considers how art can effect political change. “The question implies an integral, […]

Conversation Interview

Triple Candie reopens: “Because we saw artists as complicit with the problems we were seeing, we were motivated not to work with them”

Shelly Bancroft and Peter Nesbett are reopening Triple Candie this month at 148th Street, just west of Amsterdam. At ArtInfo, Chris Bors sits down with the husband-and-wife team, who are also the co-publishers of Art on Paper, to discuss the future of Triple Candie and its controversial past. “In 2006 […]

Conversation Writing

Hello Wikipedia, it’s the blogosphere calling

If you have any experience contributing to Wikipedia, you’ll appreciate “Wikipedia Art,” an online project launched today by artists Scott Kildall and Nathanial Stern. Of course, by the time you read this, the whole project may have been deleted by the anonymous band of pedantic Wikipedia editors (see Update below). […]

Conversation Remembrance

Bonnard: One tough son-of-a-bitch?

Mario Naves says Bonnard (1867-1947) is an artist beloved by many, but not by all. “His luminous pictures of fruit baskets, breakfast tables and keening, afternoon light have engendered surprising rancor. Only those ‘who know nothing about the grave difficulties of art,’ wrote art critic Christian Zervos shortly after Bonnard�s […]

Conversation

Thanks Birdie

Are you familiar with the art blog Dear Ada? I discovered it a few months ago over on Alla Prima’s blogroll, and immediately added it to the Two Coats link list. Maintained by a blogger named Birdie, Dear Ada features images and links to different artists’ work that catches Birdie’s […]